Lobby groups declares war on Barnett

 

Beatrice Thomas
June 25, 2012, 2:15 am

High-profile western suburbs professionals and community leaders have united to rally against the Barnett Government on multiple policy fronts as disquiet grows in the Liberal Party’s heartland.

The Western Suburbs Alliance, a union of interest groups, says the Government has presided over “an erosion of our democratic rights”.

It says its actions have caused a “growing wave of fear, anger and alienation across the western suburbs”. Key issues include high-rise rows in Cottesloe, Dalkeith and Subiaco, the Elizabeth Quay project on the Perth foreshore, local council mergers and “draconian” planning reforms such as development assessment panels.

Critically, the alliance vows to back candidates sympathetic to its causes at next year’s State election.

A letter for the group’s planned launch this week said approaches to local Liberal MPs had been “to no avail”. In contrast, wealthy businessmen and international firms had private access to Colin Barnett and his ministers for $25,000 at a so-called Leaders’ Forum.

“We elect people to represent us in Government; we then expect open consultation and constructive dialogue,” the letter says.

The more than 30 signatories include lawyer John Hammond, architect and City Gatekeepers’ spokesman Linley Lutton, Emeritus Professor Martyn Webb, Nedlands mayor Max Hipkins and Cottesloe mayor Kevin Morgan.

“It’s not a few spot fires because there’s a whole lot of people who are upset,” Mr Hammond, who heads Keep Cott Low, said yesterday.

The area includes the seats of the Premier (Cottesloe), Environment Minister Bill Marmion (Nedlands) and Education Minister and independent MP Liz Constable (Churchlands) which the Liberals hope to retake when she retires at the March election.

Political analyst Harry Phillips said upsets would be a tough task but a high-profile independent getting Labor and Greens preferences had “a good chance”.

“If I was the Government, I’d be just nervous at this stage,” he said.

Mr Barnett said the Government was making the right decisions in the interests of all in the State. He said the Cottesloe and Perth waterfront debates had gone on for decades and it was “generally accepted” WA had too many councils.

The West Australian

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Kevin Morgan expresses his views

Kevin Morgan’s interview on WTV Community Channel 44 Shadow Boxing by Tibor Meszaros regarding current issues for the March 9 2013 State Election.

What makes Cottesloe so special?

Posted June 24, 2012 by Western Suburbs Alliance [updated December 1, 2012]

Cottesloe has a unique ‘sense of place’ that both residents and visitors relate to. It has developed from a village landscape with strong connections to its natural coastal environment. The casual relaxed style contrasts with the conventional enclosed urban built form. Land and built form are predominantly horizontal and to a human scale. Cottesloe is a town of unusually high ‘walkability’ due to its high legibility, connectivity and permeability, variety of key destinations and safe streets. Interest is provided in its eclectic collection of building style and form, various activity nodes, mixed land use and constantly changing coastal landscape. The heritage-listed Cottesloe Hotel and iconic Ocean Beach Hotel are valued as an important part of the social fabric and provide facilities that are supported both locally and internationally.

The Cottesloe beachfront has a long tradition as a recreational destination. The two major activity nodes, the Cottesloe and North Cottesloe beaches, both embody a relaxed coastal character but each has distinct features. The Cottesloe beach precinct should provide a world-class model for future coastal development.

Cottesloe Foreshore Development

Posted on June 24, 2012 by Western Suburbs Alliance [updated December 1, 2012] 

Picture 3The West Australian Planning Commission (WAPC) and the State Government have given no serious thought to a proper planning process for the Cottesloe foreshore area. Ideas for developing the various beachfront sites have been strongly opposed by both residents and beach users from all parts of WA and overseas. The public has consistently and strongly expressed the view that they want the existing low rise Cottesloe panorama preserved, not the five to eight storey developments proposed by the Barnett government. Developments like the one proposed below would overwhelm and destroy Cottesloe’s valued coastal village character, something which makes it uniquely different from other Perth central coast visitor areas such as Leighton Beach, South Fremantle and Scarborough. Continue reading